Chinese New Year 2017

Flying vegetables in wok by London Food photographer, Michael Michaels

Year of the Rooster

28th of January saw the start of the Chinese New Year. This year is the year of the rooster.

In China, the celebrations also known as the Spring Festival last about 23 days. You may see some homes decorated with red posters, Chinese lanterns and poetic verses on their doors. Many people will be setting off fireworks and firecrackers to scare off the bad luck and allow the good luck in.

We like to think we played our own small part by shooting a variety of images for Uncle Ben’s which formed a tool box of promotional material to be used nationally and internationally. Some of the images you can see below.

Wok and Meal Set for Uncle Ben's by London food Photographer Michael Michaels
Wok and Meal Set

There are 12 different animals, one of which represents each year. You can find out which is yours on the chart below.

  • Rat: 2008, 1996, 1984, 1972, 1960
  • Ox: 2009, 1997, 1985, 1973, 1961
  • Tiger: 2010, 1998, 1986, 1974, 1962
  • Rabbit: 2011, 1999, 1987, 1975, 1963
  • Dragon: 2012, 2000, 1988, 1976, 1964
  • Snake: 2013, 2001, 1989, 1977, 1965
  • Horse: 2014, 2002, 1990, 1978, 1966
  • Sheep: 2015, 2003, 1991, 1979, 1967
  • Monkey: 2016, 2004, 1992, 1980, 1968
  • Rooster: 2017, 2005, 1993, 1981, 1969
  • Dog: 2018, 2006, 1994, 1982, 1970
  • Pig: 2019, 2007, 1995, 1983, 1971
Chinese dish of food by London Food Photographer, Michael Michaels
Sweet and sour chicken with vegetables and rice

 

People born in the Chinese year of the rooster are thought to be honest, intelligent, energetic and confident, yet despite this, your sign years are also believed to be the most unlucky years of your life.

Flying vegetables in wok by London Food photographer, Michael Michaels
Flying vegetables in wok